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Healthy & Free lunch for Children 18 & under this summer

Summer Programs

Children 18 years of age or younger may come to any of these locations Monday through Friday to receive a healthy and nutritious lunch.

No appointment is necessary; but the lunch must be eaten at the location.

Argyle Middle School

2400 Bel Pre Road • Silver Spring, MD

July 10 — 28 • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

City of Faith

8051 Cessna Avenue, Suite 160 • Gaithersburg, MD

June 19 — Sept. 1 • 2:00-2:30 PM

Fox Chapel Elementary School

19315 Archdale Road • Germantown, MD

June 26 — August 4 • 11:00 AM-1:00 PM

Gaithersburg
Elementary School

35 North Summit Avenue • Gaithersburg, MD

July 10 ­— August 11 • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Key Middle School

910 Schindler Drive • Silver Spring, MD

June 26 ­— August 4 • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Middlebrook Mobile

19515 North Frederick Road • Germantown, MD

June 26 — August 4 • 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

North Creek Community Center

20125 Arrowhead Road • Montgomery Village, MD

June 19 — August 11 • 12:30-2:00 PM

Northwood High School

919 University Blvd., West • Silver Spring, MD

June 26—August 4 • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Watkins Mill High School

10301 Apple Ridge Road • Gaithersburg, MD

June 26—August 4 • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Interested in receiving meals for your summer program?

The Summer Meals Program is designed to provide nutritious meals at no cost to children 18 years of age and younger. Approximately 35% of MCPS students are eligible for free and reduced price meals; and this program is designed to bridge the “nutrition gap” when school is out. 

The MCPS Division of Food and Nutrition Services is the summer food service sponsor in Montgomery County and about 9,500 children are served at approximately 120 locations each day.

Promoting a Welcoming Environment for Immigrant Students

The Center for Education Equity (CEE) at MAEC, through their Exploring Equity Issues series, offer this information on this emerging topic of “Providing a welcoming environment for immigrant students.”

Immigrant students face multiple obstacles when adjusting to their new lives in the United States. Their formative years are spent in school and this environment has a profound effect on shaping their future as productive citizens. Schools can help ease their transition and in fact, must.

The US Dept of Education guidelines remind schools that in order to comply with federal laws, they must ensure “that students are not barred from enrolling in public schools at the elementary and secondary level on the basis of their own citizenship or immigration status or that of their parents or guardians.” Once enrolled, schools can find ways to help these students flourish.

Summer Programs for Youth

School is almost out, it’s not too late to sign-up for camps to keep them active and engaged.  Montgomery County’s Department’s  of Recreation and Parks offer the following camps:
MCPS Summer Meals Program The Summer Meals Program is designed to provide nutritious meals at no cost to children 18 years of age and younger. Approximately 35% of MCPS students are eligible for free and reduced price meals; and this program is designed to bridge the “nutrition gap” when school is out. The MCPS Division of Food and Nutrition Services is the summer food service sponsor in Montgomery County and about 9,500 children are served at approximately 120 locations each day. Our goal is to provide meals to as many children as possible! Children 18 years of age or younger may come to any of these locations Monday through Friday to receive a healthy and nutritious lunch.

Youth Cruiser Summer Passes


Ride On makes it easy for those under 18 to travel around the County in the summer by offering the Youth Summer Pass, which is loaded onto a Youth Cruiser SmarTrip Card. The Pass allows kids to take unlimited Ride On trips between June 1 and August 31 for a flat fee of $18.

Starting May 16, purchase the Youth Summer at the TRiPS Commuter Stores in Silver Spring, 8404 Colesville Road and Friendship Heights, 17 Wisconsin Circle; the Montgomery County Treasury Office, 255 Rockville Pike, Suite L-15, Rockville; online at www.SmarTrip.com, or at select CVS and Giant locations. See the complete list of locations.

Kids Ride Free hours continue during the summer. The summer pass can be used for all other rides when regular fares apply.

Kids who don’t have the Youth Cruiser SmarTrip Card can buy one for $2 at any County library with proof of age and residency. The card, which is designed for County residents who are in kindergarten through 12th grade, allows students to participate in Kids Ride Free and take advantage of discounted youth monthly and summer passes.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. In our community, government and non-profit agencies work together to
  • Protect children and assist parents or caretakers in providing proper care and attention to children
  • Remedy and decrease the risk of continuing abuse and neglect
  • Provide an alternate plan of care for children when parents or caretakers are unable to proved proper and safe care for them;
Maryland’s Dept of Human Resources, offers these resources on identifying signs of neglect or abuse.

The National Child Welfare information gateway offers tip sheets in English and Spanish on such subjects as:

Locally, these agencies work together to prevent child abuse and investigate reports of suspected child abuse and neglect .

If you are a youth-serving practioner, consider attending Montgomery County Collaboration Council’s  Community of Practice’s Domestic Juvenile Sex Trafficking-Recognition Workshop This workshop is free and will be offered on Thursday, May 4th.  Contact Leteria Bailey to enroll.

Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week returns April 24 – 28

There truly has never been a more important time in our nation to honor those who dedicate their careers to serving youth in out-of-school time settings. Hear Our Roar—Join the Thunderclap!
  • The BEST opportunity to share the event with a mass audience is to join the National Afterschool Association’s  Thunderclap. Thunderclap makes going viral possible by sending a single message about Appreciation Week at the same moment, across all social channels, so it rises above the noise. You can join the movement by donating both your personal and organization followers. Let’s make a boom!
  • Make Plans to Celebrate: Families, leaders, and community members can all celebrate afterschool professionals. Download ideas here.
  • Post on Social Media: Find sample posts and downloadable graphics here and a promotional video here. Include the hashtag #heartofafterschool in your posts!
  • Share with Community Leaders, Members & Families: Send an email to colleagues and families, a press release to the media and rally your local officials to proclaim April 24 – 28 Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week. Click here to access resources.
  • And don’t forget to show your appreciation for Montgomery County’s local out of school time programs.  infoMONTGOMERY’s Youth Development Resource Guide has many resources that support families with school-aged youth and youth workers.

Support Students From Immigrant Families

For many students from immigrant families, the shifts in immigration policy over the past month have been much more than a series of news stories; these students are dealing with tangible anxiety. Not only are teachers tasked with responding to students’ fears and providing the support they need, but also they’re working to address the facts and field students’ questions about the rapidly shifting policies.

The Teaching Tolerance staff of the SPLC has put together a package of resources to help you navigate this topic in your classroom and at your school.

  Here are just a few of the resources you’ll find:

  • A printable poster to let students know they’re welcome at your school
  • A helpful guide for supporting children from immigrant and refugee families
  • Lessons for teaching a variety of immigration topic

Ten Myths About Immigration—Updated!

The Teaching Tolerance staff of the SPLC has updated their Ten Myths about Immigration to respond to the recent executive orders and proposed legislation to limit immigration and acceptance of refugees, educators and students.   The updated version of their popular “Ten Myths About Immigration” feature reflects current statistics and information so you and your students can dispel harmful stereotypes.

Take a minute to read through the article, learn why the statements are false and think about how to talk to students about the realities behind each myth.

How many of these myths have you heard?

      1. Most immigrants are here illegally.
      2. It’s easy to enter the country legally. My ancestors did; why can’t immigrants today?
      3. Today’s immigrants don’t want to learn English.
      4. Immigrants take good jobs from U.S. citizens.
      5. “The worst” people from other countries are coming to the United States and bringing crime and violence.
      6. Undocumented immigrants don’t pay taxes and burden the national economy.
      7. The United States is being overrun by immigrants like never before.
      8. We can stop undocumented immigrants coming to the United States by building a wall along the border with Mexico.
      9. Banning immigrants and refugees from majority-Muslim countries will protect the United States from terrorists.
      10. Refugees are not screened before entering the United States.
We hope that, with these facts at your fingertips, you’ll feel more confident leading constructive conversations about immigration and the role that immigrants play in shaping our history and identity as a country

Responding to Hate and Bias at School

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s Teaching Tolerance project, has developed a Guide for Responding to Hate and Bias at School. The guides is divided into three sections:
  • Before a Crisis Occurs. How can you and other school leaders assess your school’s climate with an eye toward defusing tension, preventing escalation and avoiding problems?
  • When There’s a Crisis. What are the nine key points to consider when responding to a crisis that has been triggered by a bias incident at your school?
  • After the Worst is Over. How can you address long-term planning and capacity building for the future, including development of social emotional skills?
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